JANE EYRE

After moving to Thornfield Hall, Jane discovers that Mr. Rochester is hiding a terrible secret. Will she still marry the man she loves?

THE CAST

Cozy-Classics-Younger-Jane-EyreYoung Jane Eyre – The Unloved Orphan

Cozy-Classics-Older-Jane-EyreOlder Jane Eyre – The Headstrong Governess

Cozy-Classics-Mr-RochesterMr. Rochester – The Master of the House

THE COZY VERSION

The orphaned Jane Eyre is despised by her aunt, who treats her cruelly. One day, her aunt locks her in the red room where her uncle died, and Jane is so terrified she faints! She is then sent to Lowood School where the Headmaster proves just as harsh. When Jane drops a slate and claims—honestly—that it was an accident, the headmaster calls her a liar and makes her stand on a stool in front of all the other girls.

Jane grows up to become a governess at Thornfield Hall. A few months after her arrival, she comes across a rider who has fallen off his horse and helps him on his way. When she returns to Thornfield, she discovers that the stranger is none other than Mr. Edward Rochester, the master of the house. Jane falls in love but believes Mr. Rochester is in love with someone else. Instead, he proposes to her!

On their wedding day, Jane discovers that Mr. Rochester is hiding a terrible secret. She leaves Thornfield and endures hunger and cold before being taken in. Eventually she receives an offer of marriage but realizes she’s still in love with Mr. Rochester. She returns to Thornfield only to find it destroyed by fire and Mr. Rochester blinded, but she marries him nonetheless. Soon they have a son, and his sight returns!

 

STORY TIME

Cozy Classics uses a simple one word/one image format to help babies and toddlers build vocabulary and learn everyday concepts such as body parts, emotions, animals, relationships, actions, and opposites. However, Cozy Classics organizes everyday words in a more unique way: through story. By putting words in the context of a story, our books help children find further meaning through a growing sense of narrative.

As children get older, parents can expand on the stories in ever more elaborate ways. If you need a little help, just use the brief synopsis on the back of each book or the longer synopses (the Cozy version) above. But there’s no right or wrong way to read Cozy Classics. Use the words and images as prompts to invent stories of your own and encourage your children to do the same.

Parents can enliven their storytelling with quotations from the originals. Below are some of our favorites from Jane Eyre that go well with “the Cozy version.” Quotations can lead to whole passages until one day children are enthralled by the richest versions of all: the classics themselves.

 

Quotations from Jane Eyre

  • There was no possibility of taking a walk that day. We had been wandering, indeed, in the leafless shrubbery an hour in the morning; but since dinner (Mrs. Reed, when there was no company, dined early) the cold winter wind had brought with it clouds so sombre, and a rain so penetrating, that further out-door exercise was now out of the question.
  • Daylight began to forsake the red-room; it was past four o’clock, and the beclouded afternoon was tending to drear twilight. I heard the rain still beating continuously on the staircase window, and the wind howling in the grove behind the hall; I grew by degrees cold as a stone, and then my courage sank… My heart beat thick, my head grew hot; a sound filled my ears, which I deemed the rushing of wings; something seemed near me; I was oppressed, suffocated: endurance broke down; I rushed to the door and shook the lock in desperate effort.
  • I might have escaped notice, had not my treacherous slate somehow happened to slip from my hand, and falling with an obtrusive crash, directly drawn every eye upon me…

 “A careless girl!” said Mr. Brocklehurst, and immediately after—“It is the new pupil, I perceive.” …

 “Fetch that stool,” said Mr. Brocklehurst, pointing to a very high one from which a monitor had just risen: it was brought.

 “Place the child upon it.”

  • I rose; I dressed myself with care: obliged to be plain—for I had no article of attire that was not made with extreme simplicity—I was still by nature solicitous to be neat. It was not my habit to be disregardful of appearance or careless of the impression I made: on the contrary, I ever wished to look as well as I could, and to please as much as my want of beauty would permit.
  • He passed, and I went on; a few steps, and I turned: a sliding sound and an exclamation of “What the deuce is to do now?” and a clattering tumble, arrested my attention. Man and horse were down; they had slipped on the sheet of ice which glazed the causeway.
  • “Excuse me,” he continued: “necessity compels me to make you useful.” He laid a heavy hand on my shoulder, and leaning on me with some stress, limped to his horse.
  • “Come and bid me good-morning,” said he. I gladly advanced; and it was not merely a cold word now, or even a shake of the hand that I received, but an embrace and a kiss. It seemed natural: it seemed genial to be so well loved, so caressed by him.
  • He passed on and ascended the stairs, still holding my hand, and still beckoning the gentlemen to follow him, which they did. We mounted the first staircase, passed up the gallery, proceeded to the third storey: the low, black door, opened by Mr. Rochester’s master-key, admitted us to the tapestried room, with its great bed and its pictorial cabinet.
  • I opened the door, passed out, shut it softly. Dim dawn glimmered in the yard. The great gates were closed and locked; but a wicket in one of them was only latched. Through that I departed: it, too, I shut; and now I was out of Thornfield.
  • And how impossible did it appear to touch the inmates of this house with concern on my behalf; to make them believe in the truth of my wants and woes—to induce them to vouchsafe a rest for my wanderings!
  • Thornfield Hall is quite a ruin: it was burnt down just about harvest-time. A dreadful calamity! such an immense quantity of valuable property destroyed: hardly any of the furniture could be saved. The fire broke out at dead of night, and before the engines arrived from Millcote, the building was one mass of flame.
  • Mr. Rochester continued blind the first two years of our union; perhaps it was that circumstance that drew us so very near—that knit us so very close: for I was then his vision, as I am still his right hand.

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